Decisions

Decisions published

07/12/2023 - Premises Licence: Basement , 8 Stoke Newington Road, London, N16 (Ward: Shacklewell) ref: 7604    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Licensing Sub Committee D

Made at meeting: 07/12/2023 - Licensing Sub Committee D

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/12/2023

Decision:

The Licensing Sub-Committee in considering this decision from the information presented to it within the report and at the hearing today has determined that having regard to the promotion of all the licensing objectives:

 

·  The prevention of crime and disorder;

·  Public safety;

·  Prevention of public nuisance; and

·  The protection of children from harm,

 

the application for a premises licence has been approved in accordance with the Council’s Statement of Licensing Policy and the proposed conditions set out in paragraph 8.1 of the report, with the following amendments:

 

Recorded Music:

 

Monday to Thursday    12:00 - 23:00

Friday to Saturday    12:00 - 01:30

Sunday    12:00 - 22:30

 

Anything of a similar description:

 

Monday to Thursday    12:00 - 23:00

Friday to Saturday    12:00 - 01:30

Sunday    12:00 - 22:30

 

Late Night Refreshment

 

Friday to Saturday    23:00 - 01:30

 

Supply of Alcohol (on sales)

 

Monday to Wednesday    12:00 - 23:00

Thursday  12:00 - 00:00

Friday to Saturday    12:00 - 01:30

Sunday    12:00 - 22:30

 

Opening hours

 

Monday to Wednesday    12:00 - 23:30

Thursday  12:00 - 00:30

Friday to Saturday    12:00 - 02:00

Sunday    12:00 - 23:00

 

Remove Non-standard hours from the Application.

 

Amend condition 19 as follows:

 

“All doors (including the front door at street level) shall be kept closed when regulated entertainment is in operation, except for the immediate ingress and egress of patrons. Also customers are not permitted to use Miller Terrace beyond core hours under Policy LP3”

 

And the following conditions to the Premises Licence:

 

1.  The Premises Licence holder shall provide a risk assessment to the Licensing Authority to determine the capacity for the premises.

 

2.  There shall be a written dispersal policy submitted to and approved by the Licensing Authority and the Police. The approved dispersal policy shall be implemented at the premises. All staff shall be briefed on this dispersal policy. A copy of the policy shall be kept on the premises and shall be produced to a Police officer or other authorised officer upon request.

 

The Premises Licence holder shall work with the Police to confirm the appropriate access to the premises either through the front or back doors.

 

The Premises Licence holder has agreed the following 11 conditions proposed by the Police that will be added to the premises licence:

 

1) A minimum of 1 SIA door supervisors shall be employed on a Friday and Saturday after 20:00 (and additional SIA on a risk assessment basis on Fridays and Saturdays) and at other times on a risk assessment basis. When employed, all SIA staff shall wear a high visibility armband or vest to be easily identifiable. They shall enter their name, address, SIA number and times they begin and finish their shift in a daily register. If employed by an agency all agency contact details shall be recorded also.

 

2) The premises shall maintain a comprehensive CCTV system as per the

minimum requirements of a Metropolitan Police Crime Prevention Officer. All

public areas, entry and exit points will be covered enabling frontal identification

of every person entering in any light condition. The CCTV system shall continually record whilst the premises is open for licensable activities and during all times when customers remain on the premises. All recordings shall

be stored for a minimum period of 31 days with date and time stamping. Recordings shall be made available immediately upon the request of the Police or authorised officer.

 

3) A staff member from the premises who is conversant with the operation of the CCTV system shall be on the premises at all times when the premises are

open to the public. This staff member shall be able to show Police or an authorised officer of Hackney Borough Council recent data or footage with the

absolute minimum of delay when requested.

 

4) An incident log shall be kept at the premises, and made available immediately to an authorised officer of the Hackney Borough Council or the Police, which will record the following:

·  all crimes reported to the venue

·  any complaints received

·  any incidents of disorder

·  any faults in the CCTV system

·  any refusal of the sale of alcohol

·  any visit by a relevant authority or emergency service.

 

5) There shall be clear and prominent signage asking all customers to leave quietly and respect local residents.

 

6) All instances of crime or disorder to be reported by the designated premises

supervisor or responsible member of staff to an agreed Police contact point, as

agreed with the Police.

 

7) Where the sale or supply of alcohol is taking place employees of the premises must request sight of evidence of the age of any person appearing to be under 25 years of age (Challenge 25). Such evidence may include a driving licence or passport.

 

8) The premises will display and maintain appropriate signage advising

customers of the contact details of the Designated Premises Supervisor.

 

9) All staff will be given refresher training every six months on the legislation

relating to the sales of alcohol to underage persons and drunken persons.

Written records of this training shall be kept on the premises and produced to

Police or other authorised officer upon request

 

10) The number of smokers outside will be limited to no more than 6 at any one time.

 

11) No drinks are to be taken outside.

 

Reasons for the decision

 

The application for a premises licence has been approved because the Licensing Sub-committee was satisfied that the licensing objectives would not be undermined.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Environmental Protection Team agreed conditions in advance of the hearing with the Applicant and withdrew their representation.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration the representations made by the  Metropolitan Police Service (“the Police”) and two local residents (Other Persons) objecting to this application, and their concerns about the operation of the premises late at night.

 

The Sub-committee took into account that this was an application for a premises licence, following the lapse of the previous premises licence, which was not transferred within 28 days.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Police had concerns about the later hours, and that they preferred the hours that were as previously given on the premises licence. The Police made representations that the non-standard hours proposed were acceptable and that they had no concerns following the temporary events that were held at the premises. The Sub-committee noted that the premises are proposing to have events for the community to build up the night time economy. The Police made representations that they would prefer the entrance and exit to be at the front to prevent local residents being disturbed.

 

The Sub-committee took into account that the Police visited the premises, the layout was the same as it was previously with removable tables and chairs, and the bar was in the same position. The Sub-committee noted that previously it had taken a great deal of work to get to the point of the premises licence being granted and that the Police wanted to continue that work. The Police made representations that by the Applicant operating under similar terms as the previous licence that lapsed, the Applicant would be able to build up a track record to show that they were able to comply with the terms and conditions of their licence.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration the written representations made by 2 local residents and the representations that were made during the hearing by the local resident that attended. The Sub-committee took into consideration that the local resident, who attended, did not believe that the Applicant had any experience in operating a premises licence, and that they were encouraging customers to loiter around the premises, late at night, causing a disturbance to local residents. The Sub-committee noted that the local resident did not feel that the Applicant had made their case. In addition, the local resident made representations that there was no dispersal policy and that the noise was much louder than ambient noise.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the local resident, who attended, was not persuaded by any of the representations made by the Applicant, and that they had not discharged their burden of proof to show how they would operate the premises. In addition, the Sub-committee noted the local resident felt that the Applicant did not demonstrate that they would not operate beyond their hours or that they would not add to the cumulative impact.

 

The Sub-committee heard representations from the Applicant that they were seeking an alcohol licence until 02:30 because there were other local establishments with similar hours in the area. The Applicant contended that they were looking to provide events to the LGBT customers who asked for later hours, and this prompted them to apply for later hours. The Sub-committee took into account that the Applicant did not envisage opening until 02:30 or 03:00 regularly; they were just seeking the hours so that the customers would have the option to run their events to a later time if they wanted to.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration representations from the Applicant that the back door was not kept open and that they have barriers in place to prevent the noise escaping through the back door. The Applicant confirmed that they operated successful temporary events. The Applicant made representations that they were not intending to operate the premises as it had been operated previously, and they intended to have functions for local artists, the LGBT community and the deaf community. They were not proposing to have a nightclub. They just wanted to have a small wine bar. The Applicant confirmed that they held karaoke nights which had gone well, and that the clients they were looking to attract would be those for exhibitions and customers from the deaf community to hear music through vibration of headphones. The Applicant made representations that the deaf customers wanted a place where they could go and have their celebrations.

 

The Sub-committee took into account that the Applicant will not provide food at the premises, and the expectation was that customers would either eat before or after they came to the events. The Sub-committee noted the capacity of the premises is 75 however they were not expecting to have the maximum number of customers at any one time.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Applicant had CCTV operating at the premises, and that they have done a great deal of work to improve the premises. The Sub-committee took into account that they were only seeking to have the additional hours for small extended functions up to 02:30 am and just in case the event wanted to continue later. The Applicant confirmed that they have two sets of doors at the front of the premises one is the security door that would prevent noise breakout or local residents being disturbed. The Sub-committee took into consideration that the premises are situated on a main road. Therefore, there is no drop-off and picking up points from the premises. The Applicant agreed that there would be no more than six smokers at any one time outside of the premises.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Police were satisfied with the hours and conditions agreed by the Applicant while the Applicant builds up a track record to demonstrate that they are a responsible operator.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration mitigating factors that the Applicant had been working with their neighbours and they had used a sound limiter to prevent noise nuisance. The Sub-committee felt that the Applicant had addressed the concerns raised by local residents.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration each application on its own merits, and they did not take into consideration economic factors.

 

Having taken all of the above factors into consideration, the Licensing Sub-committee was satisfied, when granting this application for a premises licence, that the Applicant had offered adequate conditions, reduced hours, and the licensing objectives would be promoted.

 

 

 

 

 

Your right to appeal

 

If you are aggrieved by any term, condition or restriction attached to this decision, you have the right to appeal to the Thames Magistrates Court, 58 Bow Road, London E3 4DJ within 21 days

of the date you receive this written decision.


07/02/2024 - Fixed Income Overview ref: 7608    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024


07/02/2024 - Equinti Contract Update ref: 7609    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024


07/02/2024 - Quarterly Update Report ref: 7610    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

To note the report

 


07/02/2024 - High Level Monitoring Report ref: 7611    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024

Decision:

 

RESOLVED:

1.  To agree the progress against the Business Plan tasks and actions, and agreed Budget. 

2.  To agree the current measures on the Strategic Objectives Scorecard.

3.  To agree the Risk Register and the risks identified.

4.  To agree the Breaches Register.


07/02/2024 - Over and Underpayment Policy ref: 7613    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

To approve the revised Overpayment and Underpayment policy.


07/02/2024 - Competition and Markets Authority’s (CMA) Objectives ref: 7612    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Pensions Committee

Made at meeting: 07/02/2024 - Pensions Committee

Decision published: 08/02/2024

Effective from: 07/02/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

1.  To agree the objectives, as set out in Appendix 1, for the Fund’s investment consultant during 2024.

2.  To note the assessment of the performance against objectives for 2023 as set out in Appendix 2.

 


29/01/2024 - `Premises Licence Re: Ground Floor, 320 Old Street, EC1V 9DR ref: 7605    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Licensing Sub Committee B

Made at meeting: 29/01/2024 - Licensing Sub Committee B

Decision published: 06/02/2024

Effective from: 29/01/2024

Decision:

This application was approved under delegated authority and therefore withdrawn from the agenda.


29/01/2024 - Premises Licence- Sandbox, 1 Quaker Street, E1 6BW ref: 7603    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Licensing Sub Committee B

Made at meeting: 29/01/2024 - Licensing Sub Committee B

Decision published: 06/02/2024

Effective from: 29/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

 

The decision

 

The Licensing Sub-Committee in considering this decision from the information presented to it within the report and at the hearing of Monday 29th January 2024 has determined that having regard to the promotion of all the licensing objectives:

 

·  The prevention of crime and disorder;

·  Public safety;

·  Prevention of public nuisance; and

·  The protection of children from harm,

 

The application for a premises licence has been approved in accordance with the Council’s Statement of Licensing Policy and the proposed conditions set out in paragraph 8.1 of the report as applied for with the following amendments agreed with the Applicant: 

 

? The hours for licensable activities, shall be, as agreed:

 

Supply of Alcohol (On and Off sales)

 

Monday to Sunday  11:00-22:30

 

(No off-sales other than in sealed containers)

 

Opening hours of the premises

 

Monday to Sunday  11:00-23:00

 

 

Amend Condition 23 to read as follows:

 

“There shall be up to 3 SIA door staff for each event and this shall be risk assessed. A copy of the risk assessment shall be kept on the premises and made available for inspection by the Police and authorised officers of other responsible authorities on request”.

 

And the following additional conditions to be added to the premises licence:

 

·  The Premises Licence shall be limited to six (6) events in any one calendar month with no carry over. In addition there shall be no more than 3 of 6 events that take place on Fridays and Saturdays in each calendar month.

 

·  The Premises Licence holder shall submit a Dispersal Policy to be approved by the Licensing Authority.

 

·  The Premises Licence holder shall submit a quarterly (at least every 3 months) Events Diary for both events in Hackney and Tower Hamlets to the and the Residents Associations (Shoreditch Community Association and SPIRE).

·  The Premises Licence holder shall maintain a dedicated contact telephone number and email address that must be available at all times to all local residents, the Environmental Health Officers, the Licensing Authority, the Police, and any responsible authority or any person wishing to make a complaint. These contact details shall be included on the website of the premises, and on display at the premises, which can be used to report concerns or complaints about the premises to a duty manager, a responsible person or a member of the management team at the premises as and when they occur.

·  The Licence holder shall hold and publicise 2 liaison meetings each year (at least every 6 months) with local residents and the Residents Associations (Shoreditch Community Association and SPIRE) to address any concerns or complaints about the premises from local residents to prevent public nuisance.

 

 

Reasons for the decision

 

The application for a premises licence has been approved because the Licensing Sub-committee was satisfied that the licensing objectives would not be undermined.

 

The Sub-committee took into account that the Metropolitan Police Service and the Licensing Authority withdrew their representations after agreeing conditions and reduced hours with the Applicant.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that Other Persons (local residents represented by 2 Residents Associations: the Shoreditch Community Association and SPIRE) in the Shoreditch area maintained their objections to the application due to anti-social behaviour, noise nuisance and the negative cumulative impact on the area. 

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Applicant amended their application by reducing the hours to core hours and that the alcohol sales were for on sales, mainly except where there are tasting events, and promotions where off sales would be sold in sealed containers to guests.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the premises would not be open to the public to walk in; it would be for invited guests to the events at the premises i.e. small exhibitions, arts and crafts, and community led events. The Sub-committee noted that the expectation was that not all events would be alcohol led.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the premises was not set up with a permanent bar, because it would need to be a blank canvas for whatever project and event that was due to take place. The Sub-committee noted that there would be no draft beer or other permanent fixtures at the premises associated with a bar or pub.

 

The Sub-committee took into account representations from the Applicant and their representative that there would be people queuing for a short period while security checks are being carried out, and checking guests into the event.The Sub-committee noted that these events are planned months in advance. The Applicant and his representative contended that the premises is not a destination, venue, and invited guests would not be expected to hang around the premises after the event ends.

 

The Sub-committee took into account representations from the Applicant and his representative that the Applicant is keeping the area secure and clean, and they do not feel that the events would add to the cumulative impact, but would benefit the area. The Sub-committee took into consideration the Applicants community efforts. The Sub-committee noted that the Applicant was cleaning the streets close to the premises, and that the Applicant offered to pay for urinals in Braithwaite Street.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that one of the representatives of the  Residents Associations decided to compromise on the number of events to be held to 6 events per month instead of operating up to seven days a week. This compromise was reached because it was noted that there are 6 years remaining for the Applicant’s Lease on the premises, and this short lease period would help reduce the cumulative impact on the area in the future.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the hours were reduced to within core hours, that the capacity of the premises was likely to be modest, and was expected to have about 30 guests on average at each event. The Sub-committee took into account that the Applicant agreed to provide a dispersal policy, the events would be risk assessed and that the Applicant wanted to engage with local residents by having meetings at least every six months to deal with any issues arising at the premises, in particular noise nuisance.

 

The Sub-committee took into account that there had been four temporary events held previously at the premises without incident or complaints.

 

Having taken all of the above factors into consideration the Licensing Sub-committee was satisfied that this application could be approved without the licensing objectives being undermined.

 

Public Informatives:

 

1.  The Premises Licence Holder is advised as part of the rigorous monitoring and checking that all staff are to be well trained, and to undertake the required training including WAVE training, training for vulnerable persons and other training offered by the Council’s Hackney Nights portal as part of the Hackney Nights accredited training scheme.

 

2.  The Premises Licence holder is encouraged to engage in meaningful dialogue with the local residents and the Residents Associations (Shoreditch Community Association and SPIRE) to resolve any issues relating to the premises, and for the Premises Licence holder to play their part in reducing any negative impacts from the premises to prevent public nuisance and disturbance to local residents.

 

3.  The Premises Licence holder is encouraged to continue working with the Responsible Authorities (the Police, the Licensing Authority and the Environmental Protection Team) to resolve any issues relating to the premises such as dispersal and noise nuisance from the premises to prevent public nuisance.

 

4.  The Premises Licence holder is encouraged to provide adequate toilet provision to prevent guests urinating in the street.

 

5.  The Premises Licence Holder is encouraged to commission an acoustic assessment.

 

6.  The Premises Licence holder is strongly encouraged to use sustainable cutlery, plates, cups, food containers, and recyclable materials to avoid using single-use plastic to prevent litter, and to protect the environment. 

 


05/02/2024 - CE S187 Universal Youth Services Centre Based (locality), Outreach and Detached Youth Programmes ref: 7602    For Determination

Decision Maker: Cabinet Procurement and Insourcing Committee

Made at meeting: 05/02/2024 - Cabinet Procurement and Insourcing Committee

Decision published: 06/02/2024

Effective from: 05/02/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

 

1.  To agree the procurement of up to 11 individual  contracts for youth provision that are delivered through centre based (locality), outreach, peripatetic or detached youth work arrangements. Each contract will run for a period of 3 years from 1st November 2024 with an option to extend for 2 years in yearly increments. The maximum budget for the services over five (5) years will be £3.5m (£700,000 p.a.).

 

2.  To agree to the extension of 13 existing Connecting Young Hackney, Lot 1 contracts for a maximum period of seven (7) months until the end of October 2024 at a maximum cost of £545K.

 

Reason(s) For Decision

 

5.1  The Council’s universal youth provision is currently delivered under a mixed economy of inhouse, and externally commissioned services from a number of Voluntary & Community Sector (VCS) organisations. This procurement seeks to contract with a range of providers to continue to complement the in-house offer and secure a comprehensive eco-system of support and opportunity for young people.

 

5.2  The Connecting Young Hackney Framework was the previous vehicle used to  provide a range of universal youth work programmes for children and young people aged 6-19 (and up to 25 for young people with SEND). The vehicle previously comprised two ‘Lots’; ‘Lot 1’ for Programmes delivered year round to improve the overall quality of life for children and young people in Hackney, and ‘Lot 2’ which was for time limited project based activities that respond to identified local needs. The Connecting Young Hackney Framework expired on 31st October 2020 and since then the contracts for Lot 1 have been individually extended until 31st March 2024 to allow for the completion of the review of Young Hackney and the previous Early Help Review (both of which inform the context for this procurement).

 

5.3  This report seeks approval for the extension of  seven months for the current individual contracts for Lot 1 in order to ensure continuity of service whilst the procurement process is completed See Appendix 3.

 

5.4  Following the decision not to extend the Lot 2 contracts beyond the end of October 2020 the monetary value of the procurement programme was converted to a new annual grants programme for children and young people to respond to the changing Hackney landscape, emerging needs, and to encourage engagement with smaller youth organisations. In its first year this programme made 28 grants, the majority of which went to smaller organisations and exceeded the expected total number of beneficiaries.

 

5.5  The learning from the previous procurement, Council grants programme, Early Help Review, Hackney Young Futures Commission and Review of the Young Hackney Service (conducted Summer 2023) have informed the business case and specification for this procurement. The change of age group for this procurement reflects the recommendations of the independent review of Young Hackney and the findings of the Young Futures Commission. The Young Hackney Review recommends focusing provision on the older age group (10-19) as the area currently with the greatest unmet need. The review also recommends ensuring young people are involved in the design, development and delivery of activities that help to attract and retain young people who are 14 years and older, inclusive of youth leadership, volunteering and social action. In arriving at this recommendation the review included a range of consultations and feedback from children, young people and families, professionals, and members of the wider Hackney community. The review also sought best practice examples from other councils and research about what works.

 

5.6  Hackney Young Futures [HYFC] was set up as an independent commission of the Council, and delivered the largest ever consultation exercise with young people in Hackney aged between 10 and 25, engaging with 2,400 young people. Contained within the recommendations is an ask for increased access opportunities to places, spaces and activities through the ‘lost hours’ between 3-7pm. The commission specifically focuses on the needs of adolescents and its findings inform the service specification for this procurement which will prioritise the development of ‘Skills for Independent Adulthood’.

 

5.7  It is noted that whilst the CYP grants programme has been successful in working with a greater number of small organisations to provide increased access to positive activities, that bids were not received for activities that meet the specific needs of young people at risk of offending and exploitation. Hackney data reported to the Youth Justice Board continues to evidence that the majority of offences are committed by children aged 15-17 years. This reinforces the need for diversionary opportunities, within safe travelling distance, that meet the interests of adolescents and enable them to develop knowledge and skills around how they can manage risk, make informed choices and stay safe.

 

5.8  Since 2019 the Council has continued to review and redesign its early help offer to ensure its accessibility and impact. Hackney Council believes that some of the most important and valuable work that is currently provided to its children, young people and their families is what is known as ‘early help’ - an offer of universal and targeted support and opportunities designed to help children and young people have the best possible start in life.  Effective early help at critical points in a child or young person’s life can significantly improve both their immediate situation and their overall life chances. Youth work is an important component of the continuum of support which encourages learning and personal and social development; developing confidence, agency, self-regulation, consideration, aspiration and other personal assets that support future success.

 

5.9  One of the key findings of the Early Help Review has been the need to ensure that Early Help is organised on a locality basis so families can access support in a space that they find comfortable. Locality based working was similarly supported through the independent review of the Young Hackney Service. Organising the Services commissioned on a locality basis and within cultural specific communities will enable relationships to be formed across organisational boundaries to better support families; providing an informal route for residents and partners to learn more about what help is available and to ensure that Universal Services are effectively sign-posted.

 

5.10  Whilst focused primarily on the delivery of open access youth work, universal youth provision is often a key point of access for families into further support and wider early help services. In support of our ambition for the transformation of services on a locality basis, the commissioning process has involved the analysis of “cold spots” of provision and beneficiary groups that were not reached through the previous procurement. The location of the existing four Young Hackney Hubs in relation to the Primary Care Network (PCN) neighbourhoods and Child and Family Hubs has been reviewed, so that this procurement complements the existing geography (as far as is practicable).

 

5.11  Through the proposed network of youth providers it is aimed that children, young people and their families will be able to participate in high quality youth services and be signposted to targeted early help without stigma. An expectation will be placed on providers to work collaboratively with the wider network of statutory and voluntary provision in their locality to meet the needs of children and young people. Whilst young people will continue to be encouraged to travel and access youth provision across the borough the following neighbourhoods will be prioritised to complement existing provision and address local need:

 

- Shoreditch Park Neighbourhood

-Well Street Community Neighbourhood

-Springfield Park Neighbourhood

-Hackney Downs Neighbourhood

 

5.16   The above is not meant to be a checklist of what youth work should deliver and providers should evidence that their offer is shaped with young people through the youth work process so that it responds to their lived experience and presenting needs, concerns and interests. Involving young people in leading their own youth work experience is essential, since adults do not always understand young people’s concerns and the learning experience lessened. This procurement will ensure that Youth participation will be a core component of delivery.

 

Contracts required

 

 

Service Category

 

No. of LOTS

Core centre based/ detached/ outreach youth work

7

Culturally Specific

3

Specialist SEND provision

1

 

 

Volumes and costing data which informed the development of the Contract Lots detailed above are provided in Exempt Appendix 1

 

Preferred Option

 

5.26  Appointment of Universal Youth Service providers through a competitive procurement process to continue the mixed economy delivery model of inhouse, and externally commissioned services.

 

  This option will maintain the existing model of service provision whilst optimising the opportunities for engaging with the voluntary sector in the delivery of a variety of services, and encouraging partnership working and consortium bids from smaller organisations. There will be scope for providers to bid to deliver programmes that maintain a unified focus on high quality youth work practice that delivers a range of measurable positive outcomes for young people, whilst improving access across the borough.

 

5.27  The Council will give providers an opportunity to bid for services  based on the following criteria:

 

5.27.1 Number/duration of weekly sessions

  It is expected that a maximum of 4 providers will provide youth work programmes for a minimum of 3 days per week (or 6 sessions) in the key locations identified, and inclusive of 8 weeks holiday provision per annum. It is also expected that 3 detached outreach/arts/ sports specialist providers will provide a year round offer. The tender will cost delivery according to the number of sessions delivered and number of children and young people served. Minimum numbers of providers have been identified to address key localities and the needs of key target groups.

 

  See Exempt Appendix 1 for more detailed costs and volumes of service delivery. The LOTs will account for the categories covered in paragraphs 5.31 to 5.33 below.

 

5.27.2 National Youth Agency Themes

·  Arts, Culture and Heritage

·  Identity and Belonging

·  Leadership,Civic engagement and participation

·  Economic and Financial wellbeing

·  Creativity and fun

·  Global citizenship

·  Skills development

·  The environment and sustainable development

·  Healthy and safe relationships

·  Health and wellbeing.

 

5.27.3 Provision that targets inequalities, including structural and systemic racism, and improves accessibility for young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities and from LGBTQi+ communities

 

5.27.4 Neighbourhoods- ‘Cold Spots’ identified

Shoreditch Park Neighbourhood

Well Street Community Neighbourhood

Springfield Park Neighbourhood

Hackney Downs Neighbourhood

 

5.27.5 Practice principles

Youth work is a deliberative educational approach, with its own pedagogy and professional base, which supports the personal and social development of young people through non-formal education. It is delivered under the principles of equal access and voluntary engagement. All commissioned providers will be expected to work to youth work methodology underpinned by an understanding of how young people develop during adolescence, reflective practice and peer education. The ability to establish boundaries and maintain trusted relationships with young people, address challenging behaviour and de-escalate conflict will be essential to all delivery.

 

Universal youth work meets the need for children and young people to socialise in a safe and secure environment and should facilitate access for vulnerable young people to early intervention and support. The importance of safeguarding children and young people and providing a safe environment for young people is central to practice. This procurement will expect Providers to evidence organisational safeguarding policy and practice which aligns with Working Together and reflects intra familial and extra familial risk. Specifically providers will be expected to be aware of Contextual Safeguarding approaches and be willing to work with partners to create safety within peer groups and localities. We will expect all commissioned youth providers to continue to develop a clear understanding of the risks and harms children and young people may face in the community and how Hackney are developing systems to screen, assess and respond to extra-familial harm.

 

  Hackney Children and Education Services expect our commissioned providers to share and work to the same practice principles, and thus be committed to eradicating systemic racism, discrimination, injustice; making anti-racism a foundation of our collective practice. We will expect all commissioned providers to join us in creating a culture of critically reflective practice and share a mutual expectation that every member of staff takes responsibility for their own learning and development with respect to anti-racist, anti-oppressive practice -  being a voice and force for change, for every child and family that we work for and with.

 

5.28  Alternative Options (Considered and Rejected)

 

  Refer to Exempt Appendix 2 - for a more in depth analysis on Insourcing Considerations.

 

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

Do Nothing-

None

1.This is not a viable option.There is a statutory duty to secure educational, recreational and leisure time activities, and sufficient facilities for such activities (Section 507B of the Education and Inspections Act), this includes the current suite of externally commissioned Universal Youth provision.

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

Manage and deliver the services in house.

(refer to insourcing Exempt  Appendix 2)

1.Would allow maximum control for the Council

 

2. In line with the Council’s ambition to insource services where practical and appropriate

Fails to make use of the particular capacity and expertise available from the local voluntary and community sector in Hackney

 

2. Lost opportunity to benefit from the  innovation and responsiveness of established local providers

 

3. Fails to maximise the potential for added social value that could be achieved through a competitive procurement process.

 

4.The Council does not have the physical assets (youth club buildings, youth bus) required to deliver this type of youth provision and would therefore require additional time and budget to establish these under this option.

 

5.Would require more capacity for management oversight of the day to day delivery of the service in addition to the extra operational staff that would be required.

Secure all the

functions via a Framework or Dynamic Purchasing System (DPS)

 

Flexibility to award further contracts during the delivery period as required.

 

2.Under a DPS additional providers could be added during the contract period

1.Additional call-offs are unlikely to be required once the initial round of contracts has been awarded

 

2.Participating in a framework is an administrative burden for providers and there is no guarantee of a contract for providers who have completed the vetting process to join the framework.

 

3.Call offs would always involve mini competitive tenders which are labour intensive for commissioners.

 

4. There is  a risk that small/ medium local providers could be excluded because they lack the capacity for regular bidding processes.

One Contract with a single supplier

 

1.Potential to achieve economies of scale

2.Minimises contract management and reporting requirements    

1.Excludes smaller and medium sized organisations

2.Fails to make use

 of the diverse experience and expertise of existing local providers, or to meet the needs of Hackney’s diverse communities

3.Likely to result in an overall loss of capacity from the local community and voluntary sector organisations currently active in this area

 

 

 

 


05/02/2024 - AHI S210 Stop Smoking Service Re-procurement Contract Award ref: 7601    For Determination

Decision Maker: Cabinet Procurement and Insourcing Committee

Made at meeting: 05/02/2024 - Cabinet Procurement and Insourcing Committee

Decision published: 06/02/2024

Effective from: 05/02/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

 

1.  To agree an award of the City and Hackney Stop Smoking Service contract to Provider A for a period of up to five years (3+1+1) from the 1st of July 2024. The total value of the contract will be a maximum of £5,698,595. This will be made up of up to £3,583,700 in core service spending (An average of £716,740 per year). There will also be up to £500,000 of central government funding to be allocated towards Optional Additional Work Packages and up to £339,978 per annum of additional central government funding to support local stop smoking services (as described in section 6.1 of the report).

 

Reason(s) For Decision

 

5.1  This report seeks to confirm the award of a contract for  =a new Stop Smoking Service based on a redesigned service model and specification including an insourced service element.

5.2  This option would seek to incorporate the latest evidence and best practice guidelines, as well as insights that have been gathered from resident and stakeholder engagement and data analysis. For completeness the changes proposed for the new service are detailed below.

5.2.1  Incorporate the latest guidance from NICE including lowering the age threshold from 18 to 12, continuing to offer behavioural support plus medication (now including nicotine-containing e-cigarettes for over 18s only) as the most effective way to support smokers to quit, with support tailored to the specific needs of individual smokers

5.2.2  Integration/alignment of community and hospital-based stop smoking and tobacco dependency treatment service pathways.

5.2.3  Strengthening and extending ongoing support for people to reduce risk of relapse and remain ‘smokefree’.

5.2.4  Increase access to harm reduction approaches for those motivated to reduce their tobacco use but not yet ready to quit in one go.

5.2.5  Specify a revised model for the City element, including new activity targets (and corresponding adjustment to the City contribution to the service budget - see savings section 7), as well as additional capacity provided through the virtual Stop Smoking London portal (available through membership of the London Smoking Cessation and Tobacco Control Programme, funded separately).

5.2.6  Insourcing of an enhanced community engagement function, through recruitment of a dedicated officer to be hosted by Hackney Council. It is proposed this would be a PO7 post and the budgeted amount for this is £80,000 per annum, which is included within the £800,000 financial envelope for this service detailed in the business case. This community engagement officer will work alongside the contracted provider and develop close partnerships with key local high risk/high prevalence communities, building on the successes of the Public Health Community Champions programme. This partnership approach will aim to ensure the service is flexible to the wider needs of priority groups, helping to deliver on the new service's priority objective to reduce inequalities in tobacco related harm. The full scope of work for the insourced community engagement officer will evolve in response to community and service needs, but is expected to include:

·  working with the service provider to build capacity in community organisations to deliver stop-smoking advice directly

·  supporting the co-development of tailored communications and targeted outreach to promote the service

·  building/strengthening relationships between high risk/prevalence communities and the service provider to maximise responsiveness and reach of the service

·  gathering insight from people in these communities to support ongoing service improvement and co-design to better meet the needs of smokers in City and Hackney.

5.2.7  Inclusion of a ringfenced outreach and engagement budget of £50k per year, to fund community partners to support the work with priority groups described above. This fund is part of the overall service budget and would be held and distributed by the provider. The provider will be required to work in close partnership with the insourced community engagement  officer to co-design an approach for allocating this funding that is proportionate, fair and transparent.

5.3  Since the start of the existing service in 2018, new guidance has been published by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) on preventing smoking uptake, promoting quitting and treating dependence. Reprocuring this service with a redesigned service model allows us to take account of this guidance, as well as wider system changes such as those implemented through the NHS Long Term Plan, as well as more recent government announcements to achieve a ‘smoke free generation’. Procuring a redesigned service will ensure the new Stop Smoking Service is responsive to these changes in the wider policy and delivery context.

5.4  This proposed new service would replace all existing provision (including community outreach, GP and pharmacy based Stop Smoking Services) and integrate with new NHS tobacco dependency treatment pathways. The new service proposals will build on learning from the coronavirus pandemic in seeking to work in partnership with the voluntary and community sector; co-designing and implementing a flexible service offer that meets the needs of those who would benefit the most, within communities where tobacco harms are high but uptake of local Stop Smoking Services has historically been low.

5.5  The evaluation and co-design work has considered options for taking an holistic approach to supporting people to address multiple health risks and address wider needs that affect people’s smoking behaviour. It has considered the most appropriate delivery model for achieving the priorities for the new service (such as a single integrated service, lead provider network or multiple contract lots and insourced provision).

5.6  Following a detailed benchmarking exercise, it was confirmed in the Business Case Report that the budget for the new service, whilst including the new/enhanced elements outlined above, can be reduced (see savings proposals in section 7).

5.7  Following a number of central government announcements both prior to and during the tender being opened, this service has been designed to be flexible to the allocation of additional streams of central government funding. These streams include the Stop to Swap scheme, financial incentives for pregnant smokers and, most recently, the additional funding for local Stop Smoking Services announced by the Prime Minister in early October 2023 (see section 6.1.1)

 

Alternative Options (considered and rejected)

 

5.9  Option 1 - End the service at the currently scheduled end date of 30/06/2024 and do not commission a new Stop Smoking Service

 

This option would allow for savings to the Council, however in doing so it would end a vital service for the tens of thousands of smokers living locally and would, therefore, have a detrimental impact on population health and risks increasing health inequalities in City and Hackney. This option does not take account of the significant health harms caused by smoking in the local context:

 

·  smoking is the primary cause of premature death and preventable illness in England - one in two long term smokers will die from a smoking-related disease

·  the annual societal costs of smoking in Hackney are estimated at over £100m each year (equivalent data are not available for the City)

·  according to data from the Annual Population Survey in 2021, smoking prevalence in Hackney amongst adults (age 18+) was 14.2%, higher than our 15 ‘statistical neighbours’ (again, equivalent data are not available for the City).

 

Whilst ending the service would release short-term savings, it should be noted that stop smoking interventions are the most cost effective (often cost ‘saving’) of all public health interventions and have the greatest impact on reducing health inequalities (along with domestic violence prevention).

 

5.9  Option 2 - Reprocuring the Stop Smoking Service based on the current service model and specification

 

The current Stop Smoking Service performs well for those who use it. Hackney’s outcomes ranked 3rd out of 16 in 2020 when compared to its statistical neighbours for both “smokers setting a quit date” and for “self-reported successful quits at 4 weeks”. Hackney’s performance against these national smoking indicators is also consistently above the England average.

 

However, the service has been less successful in attracting referrals from some high risk groups and high prevalence communities (including pregnant/post partum women, smokers from the Turkish/Kurdish community and those in routine and manual occupations). A re-designed service that is more responsive to the wide-ranging needs of City and Hackney’s diverse smoker population will help to reduce stubborn inequalities in service uptake.

 

5.10  Option 3 - Recommission a new Stop Smoking Service based on a (wholly outsourced) redesigned service model and specification

 

This option allows for the incorporation of a number of improvements to the service model (see section 5.2) and ensures that the service is up to date with the latest guidance from NICE and the wider policy context(see section 5.3).

 

Whilst this option considers the latest evidence and insight available for City and Hackney, this fully outsourced Stop Smoking Service model does not give full regard and commitment to the Hackney Labour Manifesto 2022-26 to review all outsourced services, with a view to bringing them in-house. A fully outsourced option would exclude some of the key advantages to insourcing particular elements of this service, as detailed in section 5.2.6.


18/01/2024 - Night Group, Bohemia Place (Private Road Outdoor Street Area) Mare Street E8 1DU ref: 7600    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Licensing Sub Committee A

Made at meeting: 18/01/2024 - Licensing Sub Committee A

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 18/01/2024

Decision:

The Licensing Sub-committee in considering this decision from the information

presented to it within the report and at the hearing on 18th January 2024 has

determined that having regard to the promotion of all the licensing objectives:

 

? The prevention of crime and disorder;

? Public safety;

? Prevention of public nuisance;

? The protection of children from harm;

 

the application for a premises licence has been refused in accordance with Licensing Policies LP1, LP2, and LP6 within the Council’s Statement of Licensing Policy.

 

Reasons for the decision

 

The Licensing Sub-committee, having heard and carefully considered the

representations from the Licensing Authority and Other Persons (local residents) believed that granting the application would result in the licensing objectives being undermined, and would have a negative impact on the area. 

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration the representations of 11 Other Persons (local residents) who objected to this application due the impact it would have on local residents and the excessive noise nuisance that this event would generate.

 

The Sub-committee carefully considered the representations made by the Applicant, and the Applicant’s legal representative, and they noted that the Applicant did not allay the concerns raised by the local residents and the Licensing Authority.

 

The Sub-committee felt that the Applicant needed to consider the impact of the

music on the local residents that live close to the premises. The Sub-committee felt that the Applicant needed to review their application and consider how to prevent noise nuisance. The Sub-committee took into consideration that the number of people attending the events would be high, over 2500 people, which would result in excessive noise in the area.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Applicant is capable of running a safe and good event, and that they are experienced operators. However, the noise nuisance that is likely to arise from the events and the duration of the events are unacceptable in a residential area. The Sub-committee felt the music would be too loud and would have a severe impact on local residents who live close to the event location. The Sub-committee felt that the Applicant needed to consider low intensity events that would end around 6 pm instead of until 10 pm for a one-day event. The Sub-committee felt that eight days for the events is unreasonable and excessive given the high level of noise and disturbance that would impact local residents.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration the representations made by the local residents about the impact, the event held in 2023, had on them in their homes which they tolerated at the time because they believed it would be a one off event for a celebration. The local residents did not expect such an event, with the level of loud music, to be held regularly and for so many days due to the impact it would have on their home lives.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that no tests were provided to show how the previous event held in 2023 was carried out and the impact at the time on the area.

 

The Sub-committee felt that the location of such an event should not be so close to a residential area, and it was an unsuitable location for such an event of this size and nature.

 

The Sub-committee felt that public nuisance is a major issue that all event holders need to take into consideration when planning events of this nature. It was clear to the Sub-committee that the Applicant had not fully considered the impact on the residential area and had not carried out the required testing for noise. The Sub-committee felt that the applicant needed to engage with local residents to work out what would be best for the area when holding such events to prevent noise nuisance.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration that the Applicant had a Noise

Management Plan. However, the Applicant had not presented any data and

evidence as to how the noise was managed. The Sub-committee felt that there was an absence of how the Noise Management Plan data could be handled.

 

The Sub-committee did recognise that the Applicant is a good indoor venue

operator. However, this application undermined the licensing objectives. The Sub-committee could not find a compromise following the representations made objecting to this application.

 

The Sub-committee took into consideration when refusing this application that each case is considered on its merits. The Sub-committee believed that the licensing objectives could not be promoted by granting this application for a premises licence, and as such believed it was appropriate to refuse the application in its entirety.

 

Public informative

The Applicant is advised to consider a low intensity event in the future and to work with local residents and the Environmental Protection Team to prevent noise nuisance in the area.

 

Your right to appeal

 

If you are aggrieved by any term, condition or restriction attached

to this decision, you have the right to appeal to the Thames

Magistrates Court, 58 Bow Road, London E3 4DJ within 21 days

of the date you receive this written decision.


31/01/2024 - Audit and Anti-Fraud Progress Report to January 2024 ref: 7598    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To consider and note the progress and performance of the Audit & Anti Fraud Service to 31 December 2023 (Appendices 1 - 4).


31/01/2024 - Corporate Risk Register ref: 7597    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To note the contents of the report and the attached risk registers and controls in place.


31/01/2024 - External Audit Update ref: 7596    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED:

 

1.  To note the contents of the reports;

 

2.  To authorise the Group Director of Finance to approve the final Statement of Accounts for 2022/23, contingent upon the completion of the outstanding work by the external auditor, as detailed in the audit completion reports (see Appendix 1 & 2).


31/01/2024 - Climate, Home and Economy Directorate Risk Register ref: 7595    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To note the contents of the report and the attached risk registers and controls in place.


31/01/2024 - Treasury Management Strategy 2024/25 ref: 7594    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To approve the draft Treasury Management Strategy 2024/25 to 2026/27 for submission to Council, subject to Capital programme that is being finalised ahead of budget report, with delegation to the Group Director Finance to approve the final Treasury Management Strategy for submission to Council.


31/01/2024 - Treasury Management Update ref: 7593    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To note the treasury management activity reports at Appendices 1 and 2


31/01/2024 - Finance Update ref: 7592    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To note the update on the overall financial position.


31/01/2024 - Audit Committee Work Programme ref: 7599    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: To note the proposed work programme.


31/01/2024 - Minutes of the Previous Meeting ref: 7591    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Audit Committee

Made at meeting: 31/01/2024 - Audit Committee

Decision published: 01/02/2024

Effective from: 31/01/2024

Decision:

RESOLVED: That the Minutes of the previous meetings be agreed as a correct record.


16/01/2024 - Application for a Premises Licence: Hoxton Spirits HQ, 1st floor, 2-4 Holywell Lane, Hackney EC2A 4QS ref: 7590    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Licensing Sub Committee D

Made at meeting: 16/01/2024 - Licensing Sub Committee D

Decision published: 31/01/2024

Effective from: 16/01/2024

Decision:

 

 

The Licensing Sub-Committee in considering this decision from the information

presented to it within the report and at the hearing of Tuesday 16 January 2024

has determined that having regard to the promotion of all the licensing

objectives:

 

·  The prevention of crime and disorder;

·  Public safety;

·  Prevention of public nuisance; and

·  The protection of children from harm,

 

The application for a premises licence has been approved in accordance with the Council’s Statement of Licensing Policy and the proposed conditions set out in paragraph 8.1 of the report as applied for with the following amendments agreed with the Applicant.

 

? The hours for licensable activities, shall be, as agreed:

 

Supply of Alcohol

 

Monday to Saturday 10:00-23:00

Sunday    10:00-22:00

 

Opening hours

 

Monday to Saturday 10:00-23:00

Sunday    10:00-22:00

 

The Applicant agreed amendments to the following conditions on page 72 of the application report:

 

·Delete Condition 10.

 

·Condition 6 shall be amended to read as follows:

 

‘Alcohol orders shall be supplied by delivery only’.

 

·Condition 8 shall be amended to read as follows:

 

‘General members of the public shall not be permitted on the premises to purchase alcohol.’

 

The Applicant agreed to the following additional conditions:

 

·  No more than two delivery drivers at any one time shall stand and wait outside the premises to collect drink orders.

 

·  The Premises Licence Holder shall provide a Delivery Management Plan to include a code of conduct, for staff for noise nuisance in the building and requirement for no queueing outside the premises to be approved by the Licensing Authority.

 

Reasons for the decision

 

The application for a premises licence has been approved because the Licensing Sub-Committee was satisfied that the licensing objectives would not be undermined.

 

The Sub-Committee acknowledged that the Applicant had made representations that the application was for off sales only and that the alcohol was not distilled on site. The Sub-Committee noted that alcohol sales were through postal and Internet sales. There was no public access to the premises. The Applicant would use the stairwell on premises to ensure it did not affect local residences.

 

The Sub-Committee recognised that the Applicant had amended their application by withdrawing the click and collect element of the application to prevent any potential noise nuisance or disturbance to local residences. The Sub-Committee took into account that alcohol sales were managed through a third-party delivery firm that they used called Quiver. The Sub-Committee noted that delivery drivers were instructed to park in a designated area and not on the red route.

 

  The Sub-Committee took into account that the Licensing Authority had made representations on the grounds of Public Nuisance. The Licensing Authority welcomed the news that the Applicant had amended the application to remove the click and collect element. The Sub-Committee took into consideration that the Licensing Authority were now satisfied that the licensing objective would not be undermined and that their concerns were alleviated by the amendments to the application.

 

The Sub-Committee noted that the Other Person, who was the freeholder of the premises, had withdrawn their representation before the hearing following discussions with the Applicant.

 

Having taken all of the above factors into consideration the Licensing Sub-Committee was satisfied that this application could be approved without the licensing objectives being undermined.

Wards affected: Hoxton East & Shoreditch;